Lebanese family turns to social media to help save mother’s life

When Lebanon’s healthcare system fails, the well-being of a thousand citizens hangs in the balance. Such is the current reality of Rozine Moughalian –a 56-year-old Lebanese psychologist and mother of two– who is now fighting for her life.

Up until a few months ago Rozine had lead a relatively “normal” existence, working 3 jobs, and providing for her family. She is currently bedridden, having been diagnosed with sub-acute liver failure, the cause of which is likely to have been her exposure to high levels of toxins.

Family members believe that her illness may be attributed to the appalling levels of pollution in her area of residence, Bourj Hammoud, where preparations on the site of a newly reopened landfill are underway and where piles of rotting trash lined the streets for months.

“Mom does not have the money for such a surgery, and she doesn’t have access to free quality healthcare,” Catherine Moughlian, Rozine Moughlian’s daughter says.

“I find it absurd that my mom [may not be able to] live out the month because we can’t afford the money or a donor. She has the right to access free medical care, she has the right to get appointments with doctors without wasta (meaning: connections), and the right to be admitted into the hospital at the expense of the National Social Security Fund (NSSF) without having to wait a day in the ER while we make the ‘right calls to the right people’,” she adds.

Doctors fear the worst for Rozine and say that she may not stand a chance if she is unable to receive the much needed medical care. In light of the urgency, her family has turned to social media for help, seeing that they stood no chance against the Lebanese healthcare system -one that has failed so many before them.

In this regard a crowdfunding campaign was launched in hopes of helping her family secure the funds, which were initially estimated at a hefty $USD 200,000 price tag. The procedure’s cost, now confirmed at a staggering $USD 300,000, increased due to the change in location as Rozine will have to be relocated to France for treatment. A petition to grant her a swift VISA was also launched and will be delivered to the General Consulate of France in Lebanon after enough signatures are gathered. All details related to the campaigns progress can be found on a page set up on Facebook by her daughter.

Social media has come to Rozine’s aid, but only part of the money has been raised thus far. The Zoomal campaign reaches its deadline on the 29th of July, and Rozine’s family is running out of options.

Here’s what you can do:

Online:

Click on this page and make a donation, even if it means only a few dollars. Every cent counts.

Rozine Needs a Liver Transplant | Catherine Moughalian | Lebanon

Offline:

A fundraiser gathering for offline donations will be held on Wednesday July 27, at 8 pm in Beirut’s Art Lounge. All details are available on this link.

ArtLoungeMap
03-997 676 | info@artlounge.net

If you can’t make it to the event, but would still like to make a contribution then please head to the Haven House between 11 am and 11 pm any day of the week. For location and all other details please call this number: 03-273036, or send an email to: info@havenforartists.org

Pick ups for offline donations are also available. For more information please contact Ghina Ghanem on :03 – 279402.

To contact the Moughalian family directly, please call this number: 03-098817, or send an email to: catherine.moughalian@gmail.com

Spread the word:

Please share this post, or share the any of the info provided to better increase the campaign’s exposure.

Alternatively, and if possible, contact any donors who you think may be interested in helping but whom are not internet literate.

The only thing standing between Rozine and her life are the funds needed. Please, let’s not let money get in the way of a full recovery.

 

About 
Nadine Mazloum is an Australian born, Beirut bred multimedia journalist, editor, and blogger. She most recently worked as StepFeed's Senior Editor. Before that, she was the news editor and resident blogger for the Lebanese Broadcasting Corporation International [LBCI] and has held several positions with well-known media outlets both locally and internationally. Her work appears online both on LBCI and on her personal blog, NewsroomNomad©.

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